10 reasons NFL players should be allowed to take a knee during national anthem

In light of the violent protests that have taken place in the U.S., NFL players have been taking a knee since last season.

As an example of how this is happening, NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick took a knee last season and even appeared to have the nerve to ask for forgiveness for the past and the future.

But, now that he’s back to the position he’s in, Kaepernick has been the target of backlash and has been booed off the field.

And, now the league is trying to rein him in.

In a new statement, NFL commissioner Roger Goodell said that he supports all players’ freedom to protest.

“I have always supported the right of players to peacefully protest in the workplace and throughout their communities,” he said.

“To that end, we will continue to listen to and act on feedback from our players and coaches on this issue, including those who have spoken out against it. “

“Our work continues. “

And we will do so in a manner that respects their beliefs and their freedom to express themselves. “

Our work continues.

“As an organization, we are committed to working collaboratively with all those who wish to protest during the national moment of silence. “

“And while we recognize that not all athletes are willing or able to take such a step, I am committed to the rule of law and to working with our players to make sure they do not get in trouble for taking this action. “

“In the coming weeks and months, we’ll be working to educate our players about the difference between peaceful protests and physical violence, and I know the NFL will continue working with them to make that as clear as possible.” “

Goodell also added that the NFL is open to discussing the issue with other organizations and has reached out to the White House, the National Basketball Association, the NFL Players Association, Major League Baseball, and the National Association of Black Journalists to get feedback on the issue. “

In the coming weeks and months, we’ll be working to educate our players about the difference between peaceful protests and physical violence, and I know the NFL will continue working with them to make that as clear as possible.”

Goodell also added that the NFL is open to discussing the issue with other organizations and has reached out to the White House, the National Basketball Association, the NFL Players Association, Major League Baseball, and the National Association of Black Journalists to get feedback on the issue.

And in a statement, the players association said that Goodell and the league have spoken and that the players have decided to honor their commitment to protest, “not because of any political agenda, but because they believe that it is in the best interest of the game, our country, our sport and our players.”